Harbor Seal

Where can I see the Harbor Seal

Photo credit
Nico-becker
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A Harbor Seal is a large seal that is found in shallow coastal water areas. They are part of the Phocidae family of seals and have a silvery coat with an underbelly that is slightly lighter in color. Their scientific name is Phoca vitulina, which means they belong to the same family as earless or hair seals (Phocidae) but they don't actually have external ears.

They are also very closely related to sea lions and fur seals .

The general consensus about these creatures' range is that there has been at least one sighting off the Alaskan west coast, but it's most common sightings are along North America's east coast where people most commonly refer to them as "Common Seals".

Harbor Seals can be found in waters that are partially frozen and right by the equator, to as far south as Patagonia.

Most of these seals don't travel too far from their birthplace but there have been a few recorded cases of Harbor Seals traveling several thousand miles from their birth place.

They spend most of their lives in the water , but they do come onto land during low tide to rest or escape predators.

In terms of size, they range from 5 to 6 feet long, with an average weight of between 150-270 pounds . Their teeth also play a vital role in how these creatures survive because they use them to catch shell fish and other marine animals that live on the sea floor .

Animal population
315,000
Population
IUCN Classification
Least Concern (LC)
IUCN Classification
Best time to see the Harbor Seal
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Awful

Geeky Facts about the Harbor Seal

Fact 1

The harbor seals can dive up to 300 feet and stay submerged for almost 30 mins.

Fact 2

They tear their food into chunks or swallow it whole.

Fact 3

The harbor seal is the only pinniped that breeds along Puget Sound.

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